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1864
Our new/old home blog
1864

Hello-
If you are into renovating old homes or just want to follow along as we go about the process of bring our 1864 Greek Revival home back to its original form with some modern upgrades, follow along on my blog. I will be posting as much as possible about everything to do with the house setbacks, cost, progress, problems found and how we fixed them and much more.

Jack
Re: Our new/old home blog
Jack

Welcome to the forum and good luck with your new old house.

Jack

MLB Construction
Re: Our new/old home blog
MLB Construction

this will be fun to watch. just please let us know when it's updated so we don't forget about it.

Re: Our new/old home blog

added some new pictures to the blog, check it out and let me know your ideas.

Jack
Re: Our new/old home blog
Jack

It's always interesting what you find in old houses, but if you have questions please post them on the forum in the appropriate thread. Posting pictures is not asking questions.

Jack

Re: Our new/old home blog

I have a question on my planned approach to dealing with some settling issues, before I ask the question I will give a little information so hopefully you guys can make some recommendation or tell me if i'm right or wrong in moving forward with this plan.
First, about two years ago the kitchen and both bathrooms got remodel from the studs up and a great job was done however the remodels compensated for the out of level and plumb issues that the house has. I am making an educated guess that because none of the tile or Sheetrock has shown any signs of movement after the remodel was done (over two years) that the structural issues have not continued to get worse. question one: do you believe this assumption is correct?

my first plan was to attempt to level the floors and correct the out of plumb issues and lower the basement. I am concerned that by doing this I will create major issues with the remodel of the kitchen and baths, all three are level and plumb now and would not be if I attempted to correct the rest of the house.

my plan moving forward: I plan to add additional support to the beams in the basement, sistering any damaged joist, adding additional columns for beam support, re pointing brick and field stone foundation inside, waterproofing, insulating and finishing the walls.

I am aware that in a perfect world with an unlimited amount of money correcting the overall level and plumb of the house would be the best (this I roughly estimate would cost 200K by the time it's all done).

so finally to the question is my 2nd plan (in bold above) a good idea.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Our new/old home blog
Mastercarpentry

[QUOTE=1864;299025 the remodels compensated for the out of level and plumb issues that the house has. [/QUOTE]

Based on how they compensated for this, moving the structure may not be a good idea now unless you want to go through that process again. At best it will be a partial re-do so perhaps it would be better to wait and address the out-of-level conditions later when it's time for the next make-over for those areas, then do both together. I've leveled a lot of 'back porch bathroom' floors by shimming on top of the old floor system. To do anything with them afterward you'd have to tear back out to where I started probably losing all the flooring in the process. These are all old "mill houses' with 'shed' roofs; on anything nicer I recommend re-leveling from foundation up as the correct way. Not knowing what they did to 'compensate' I can't offer more than that at this point.

Most settlement occurs very slowly and the "bad ones" will usually show problems within 2-5 years, so in that regard I think you're OK. Adding support never hurts anything but budgets so if you're OK with that then make it stronger but keep all strengths equal throughout so that any future slow settling will occur evenly. And as long as you're not going to run into gapping issues at the house's perimeter if you level later, that can still be an option with added support done now.

Keep us updated with the progress!
Phil

loganseth
Re: Our new/old home blog
loganseth

hi all friends I am new to this forum

Re: Our new/old home blog

I have removed the remainder of the Sheetrock on the ceiling of the basement exposing some additional issues. check out the attached video. strangely all of the floor joist on the left side of the supporting post are double (true) 2x8 this is good because the majority of the weight is on that side kitchen full bath tiled. everything on the right side is not so good it looks like the floor joist are sagging approximately 4". At this point I don't see how I can go without correcting this. directly above this sag is a load Bering wall all the way up two 1/2 floors. Everything above has been compensated to adjust for this sag (hide it) i.e floors, stairs ect so by correcting this I am accepting that the stairs and the tile floor in a half bath are going to need replacing along with lots of Sheetrock cracks.
thoughts

Mastercarpentry
Re: Our new/old home blog
Mastercarpentry

Ouch! I was afraid you'd find something like that. Now you can see the value of doing things the right way, for if they had leveled the sagging house instead of the individual floor sections you wouldn't be in this dilemma now.

To do it right is still the best way because that sag bears a structural load, and it's affecting more than just ceilings and floors- it's affecting everything above it. Costly and extensive, yes, but it's still the right way. Can you reinforce things where they are now to prevent further sagging? Sure, but the original problem is still there and is going to keep biting you anytime you have to work things around that sag in the future. You've got a big decision to make with no easy choices and I sure don't envy you right now.

I just repaired a bathroom floor; on the surface the floor was soft from water damage. Underneath I could see a section had already been 'repaired' by blocking between joists and scabbing beside them for a small piece of subflooring. Didn't do a lot of good attaching new framing to rotting joists but they did it and it lasted a few years I guess. I did a proper repair and now that floor will last another 50+ years instead of a few. During the demo I counted 5 layers of flooring material (the top one tile done over that poor patchwork) and 3 layers of added substrate on top of the original finished hardwood flooring. Seems that everyone who had ever been there before me patched instead of fixed. You have to fix problems at their source to do things the right way. It costs more but it doesn't come back to haunt you later.

Phil

Re: Our new/old home blog

We have decided to go ahead and covert the basement to livable space, and I have a couple questions. First the basement is currently about 6' so we plan on making it 7'6" (finished hight) it looks to have a brick on top of stone foundation. can the additional couple feet be built from cement blocks reinforced with 1/2" rebar this would be on top of a 16"x8" footer? Or should it be solid cement? I intend to place cement in the voids in the block for extra strength would also have the rebar going down the voids and tieing into the footer.

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